Utopia

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PREMIERE St. Mark's Church, December 2018

What does Utopia mean to you?

Is it a physical, external place— or, might it reside internally?

Choreographed by Valerie Green and in collaboration with visual artist
Keren Anavy, VG/DE’s newest evening length work, Utopia, explores the
idea of a perfect place through dance and visual art.

Anavy has turned her large-scale paintings into 10-foot cylindrical
pillars to be used throughout the piece. The pillars act as an extension of
the internal world, constantly forming barriers, spaces, and other
environments for the dancers to both react to and orchestrate. This
dynamic art installation is in perpetual motion, being constantly built
and dismantled.

Acting as both props and set, Anavy’s painted pillars contribute to Utopia’s striking energy and challenge the viewer’s conception of how art, dance, and design interact with and influence one another.


Utopia at St. Mark’s Church Photographer: Stephen de las Heras · Location: St. Mark’s Church In The Bowery · Artwork: Keren Anavy

Utopia at Lincoln Center  Photographer: Darial Sneed · Event: APAP Booking Dance Festival · Location: Jazz at Lincoln Center

Utopia at Queens Museum Photographer: Nomi H. Rave · Location: Queens Museum · Artwork: Keren Anavy

Utopia at NARS Foundation  Photographer: Nomi H. Rave · Event: Utopia · Location: NARS Foundation


CHOREOGRAPHY  Valerie Green

COMPOSER  Mark Katsanounis

VISUAL ARTIST  Keren Anavy

LIGHTING DESIGN  Kathy Kaufmann

COSTUMES  Deborah Erenberg

RUNNING TIME  65 minutes

NUMBER OF DANCERS  7 dancers

PRESENTED BY  Danspace Project @ St. Mark’s Church • Wave Hill • Queens Museum • Dixon Place • NARS Foundation • APAP Booking Festival • Green Space • Collaborative Concepts • Movement Research


Press Quotes

A mesmerizing collaboration.
— Pat King, METRO NY
Meticulously crafted, contemplative, mesmerizing.
— Catherine Grau, Queens Museum Public Programs Coordinator
Anavy’s site-specific environments cue us in on the realm that lies just beyond the traps we’ve set for ourselves. The images ask of us, what do we see, and from where we see, why are such worlds not possible?
— James Diaz, Anti-Heroin Chic